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Of course Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour doesn’t remember race relations “being that bad” in the 1960s; he’s a white guy!
 
I grew up in the 60s in North Carolina, and I don’t remember race relations being bad at all for us whites. We could go anywhere we wanted and do anything we wanted.
 
We didn’t have to go to segregated schools, drink from “colored” water fountains or sit upstairs in the “colored” section at movies.
 
And if we lived in Mississippi, we didn’t get shot, beaten and killed if we tried to vote or demonstrate for integration.
 
But shouldn’t a man who’s been involved in politics for all these years, as Barbour has, now realize: “Hmmm, maybe things were pretty bad if you were black”?
 
What is it in the Republican/conservative mindset that persists – 40 years later – in denying that what went on in the South then was wrong? Are they morally blind – or just politically cynical? Either way, it’s a sorry way to be.
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Huh?
# Huh?
Monday, December 27, 2010 6:41 PM
Oh come on Gary you know Republicans live in a color blind society. Even history is color blind to them. They can't remember that blacks had to use the back door if they came to your house, look down whenever they talked to a white person and order takeout from the kitchen door at the diner. They can't acknowledge that colored people lived in a world where their economic survival depended on the goodwill of whites. When you look at the past with rose colored glasses it's easy to understand why they think we are all on an even playing field today. And remember here in North Carolina things tended to be significantly less extreme when compared to life a little further south. Or am I looking at it with my own rose colored glasses?
dap916
# dap916
Tuesday, December 28, 2010 10:52 AM
Gary,
Your last two presentations here on the front page of TAP have been about social issues. I see this on many "democrat venues" and left-leaning websites all across the Internet. Although many of these issues are important to all of us, I do not believe that this is what should be on top of the list with regard to the national discourse right now. I know that the democrats want very much to maintain the belief some have that republicans are mean-spirited and hard hearted and not "accepting" of those that may be different from the norm. And, in some cases, that's true. It is easy to find incidents where a republican in some leadership position or a republican elected official has made some disparaging remark about gays or says something about race issues that isn't true or is even stupid or shows a lack of understanding. And, when those are found it is usually used to continue the negative portrayals about republicans as a whole.

But, truth is even though these social issues are important, this is not what's bringing our country down. Our most pressing problems in America today are economical, not social. Both parties have been remiss in their attitudes and policy in this regard and unless there is a concerted effort to find remedies to those problems that affect ALL of our citizens, we're most certainly going to find ourselves in dire circumstances all across the vast spectrum of wealth classes in our country. Making sure all races and all people of different sexual preferences is important....it's just not priority #1 and until both parties join forces in attacking our country's financial woes, no social issue will mean much in our future.

I am truly hopeful that we can work together politically to bring America back to being the country that actually DOES offer the dream of prosperity and freedom to succeed. No other issue is more important to our survival.

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